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The Vin Scully Map Guide to Los Angeles

In honor of the great broadcaster's final game

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Over the course of his 67 years in the broadcaster's booth, Vin Scully's concise, poetic style has become as iconic, as indicative of the Dodgers as their blue and white caps.

Scully began calling Dodger games in the early 1950s, back when the team was still in Brooklyn and their name (for Trolley Dodgers) made sense. In 1953, at the age of 25, he became the youngest person to ever call a World Series; two years later, he called the Fall Classic again, as the Dodgers won their only championship in Brooklyn. When the team packed up and headed west in 1958, Scully came with.

The Dodgers met with quick and easy success under the sun. Sandy Koufax ruled the mound, a new stadium was built (shadily), and championships were won in 1959, 1963, and 1965. Scully was there for it all. His call of the ninth inning of Koufax's only perfect game is held up as arguably the single greatest bit of sports broadcasting in the history of the medium.

Scully, a transplant, ingratiated himself with Angelenos. Players, managers, and owners have come and gone, but through it all, he's been there. A 1964 Sports Illustrated profile states that his "voice is better known to most Los Angelenos than their next-door neighbor's is," that "millions of southern Californians have Vin Scully with their supper."

He is a titan, a walking civic landmark on par with the Hollywood Sign and LA's scattered, smoggy skyline. As apple pie is to America, Scully is to Los Angeles. He put it best himself, in a piece for Los Angeles magazine:

The first few years I was here, the Mets were not in existence. It's 1958, '59, '60, '61, and we'd go to Philadelphia, and I would take the train to New York to visit family and friends. They would say, How do you like it? I would say, It's really nice, and they would say, It's got smog and earthquakes and so on. The first few times I would argue and say, No, it's not that bad. By the fourth year they would start up and I'd say, You're right, and tell your friends to stay right here. And that's when I knew I was an Angeleno. As God is my judge.

Go Dodgers. Ian Grant

· Maps to the Stars [Curbed LA]

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1. Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum

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3911 S Figueroa St
Los Angeles, CA 90037
Scully called games at the Coliseum from 1958 to 1961, while Chavez Ravine was scooped out and turned into the Dodgers' new home.

2. Millennium Biltmore Hotel Los Angeles

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506 South Grand Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90071
Scully and his wife stayed with the team at the Biltmore just after arriving from Brooklyn, as more permanent arrangements were made.

3. Brentwood Apartment

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134 Stonehaven Way
Los Angeles, CA 90049
Scully's first permanent arrangements were somewhere in Brentwood, in "a little two-story apartment house on a corner in Brentwood, just off Sunset Boulevard," where he was neighbors with the Wizard of Westwood himself, John Wooden.

4. Dodger Stadium

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1000 Elysian Park Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90012
The Dodgers' ill-gotten, undeniably beautiful stadium has been Scully's home for the past 53 years.

5. NBC Studios

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3000 W Alameda Ave
Burbank, CA 91505
Scully hosted the kitsch-tastic gameshow It Takes Two, which was filmed at NBC's hallowed Burbank studio, from 1969 to 1970.

6. Rustic Canyon Park

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102-178 Latimer Rd
Santa Monica, CA 90402
Scully and family spent days together at this local park while living in Pacific Palisades. (It's also home to an abandoned Nazi-sympathizer compound.)

7. Walk of Fame Star

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6675 Hollywood Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90028
Scully has a star on Hollywood Boulevard, the same street he once walked with teenage buddies in search of celebrities.

8. Paul's Kitchen

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1012 S San Pedro St
Los Angeles, CA
(213) 749-5004
Greasy Chinese joint that has served a whole lot of chow mein to Tommy Lasorda and other Dodgers legends since 1946.

9. Home

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2663 Elderoak Lane
Thousand Oaks, CA 91361
Scully now lives in tony Lake Sherwood, a gated community/country club in Westlake Village.

10. Costco

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5700 Lindero Canyon Road
Westlake Village, CA 91362
Scully does his shopping at the Westlake Village Costco, where he lost his 1988 World Series ring for a terrifying nine minutes last December.

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1. Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum

3911 S Figueroa St, Los Angeles, CA 90037
Scully called games at the Coliseum from 1958 to 1961, while Chavez Ravine was scooped out and turned into the Dodgers' new home.
3911 S Figueroa St
Los Angeles, CA 90037

2. Millennium Biltmore Hotel Los Angeles

506 South Grand Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90071
Scully and his wife stayed with the team at the Biltmore just after arriving from Brooklyn, as more permanent arrangements were made.
506 South Grand Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90071

3. Brentwood Apartment

134 Stonehaven Way, Los Angeles, CA 90049
Scully's first permanent arrangements were somewhere in Brentwood, in "a little two-story apartment house on a corner in Brentwood, just off Sunset Boulevard," where he was neighbors with the Wizard of Westwood himself, John Wooden.
134 Stonehaven Way
Los Angeles, CA 90049

4. Dodger Stadium

1000 Elysian Park Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90012
The Dodgers' ill-gotten, undeniably beautiful stadium has been Scully's home for the past 53 years.
1000 Elysian Park Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90012

5. NBC Studios

3000 W Alameda Ave, Burbank, CA 91505
Scully hosted the kitsch-tastic gameshow It Takes Two, which was filmed at NBC's hallowed Burbank studio, from 1969 to 1970.
3000 W Alameda Ave
Burbank, CA 91505

6. Rustic Canyon Park

102-178 Latimer Rd, Santa Monica, CA 90402
Scully and family spent days together at this local park while living in Pacific Palisades. (It's also home to an abandoned Nazi-sympathizer compound.)
102-178 Latimer Rd
Santa Monica, CA 90402

7. Walk of Fame Star

6675 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90028
Scully has a star on Hollywood Boulevard, the same street he once walked with teenage buddies in search of celebrities.
6675 Hollywood Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90028

8. Paul's Kitchen

1012 S San Pedro St, Los Angeles, CA
Greasy Chinese joint that has served a whole lot of chow mein to Tommy Lasorda and other Dodgers legends since 1946.
1012 S San Pedro St
Los Angeles, CA

9. Home

2663 Elderoak Lane, Thousand Oaks, CA 91361
Scully now lives in tony Lake Sherwood, a gated community/country club in Westlake Village.
2663 Elderoak Lane
Thousand Oaks, CA 91361

10. Costco

5700 Lindero Canyon Road, Westlake Village, CA 91362
Scully does his shopping at the Westlake Village Costco, where he lost his 1988 World Series ring for a terrifying nine minutes last December.
5700 Lindero Canyon Road
Westlake Village, CA 91362