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Updated: The ‘Twin Peaks’ Los Angeles filming locations map

From Ennis House to an Irish pub in DTLA, 25 places in LA where the cult favorite was filmed

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Editor’s note: This post was originally published on May 15, 2017 and has been updated with the most recent information.

Twin Peaks may be heavily associated with the rainy, Ponderosa Pine-filled landscape of the Pacific Northwest, but many scenes were shot around Los Angeles. It’s a testament to the region’s dynamic topography that few seemed to notice.

It makes sense that Twin Peaks co-creator and longtime LA resident David Lynch would make a point of shooting here. For 40-plus years, the city and its very un-Twin Peaks-like climate have provided the lovably-eccentric auteur with the inspiration he needed to thrive creatively.

“The light is what brought people here—the good weather and the light,” Lynch says in a behind-the-scenes featurette included on the U.K. Blu-ray of Eraserhead. “But the light is magical, because for me, it is like a happiness—a light that gives you energy and an indication that anything is possible. It’s, I think, critical for me to feel that light.”

With the return of Twin Peaks on Sunday night, we’ve mapped more than a dozen LA-area filming locations. So, grab yourself a damn fine cup of coffee and enjoy. (Note: some of the locations listed are private residences, so please respect that when scouting them for yourselves.)

And, for a map of Washington filming locations, scoot over to Curbed Seattle.

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Newcomb’s Ranch Restaurant & Bar

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This biker-beloved institution along the scenic Angeles Crest Highway has been described as a “rustic roadhouse” by the Los Angeles Times, so it’s not hard to see why it was chosen as the site of Big Ed’s Gas Farm after the pilot episode. Twin Peaks Season 2 location manager Barry Gremillion praises the restaurant for its “old-fashioned” allure, saying: “It can be anything. Gas station, roadhouse, bar…” Heck, maybe even a drape store.

Via Google Maps

Ennis House

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This striking, oft-filmed “textile block” home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright was the location used for Invitation to Love, the soap-within-a-soap that often mirrored the plot twists happening in the town of Twin Peaks. With its theatrical granite architecture and sweeping views of the LA basin, it’s the perfect backdrop for over-the-top melodrama.

Via edward stojakovic / Flickr creative commons

Sierra Madre Pioneer Cemetery

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The doomed Laura Palmer was laid to rest at this suburban cemetery—fitting, given what Gremillion termed a “woodsy,” “very Twin Peaksy” vibe. The cemetery was used later on in the series, but locals eventually made things so difficult that the production began to second-guess the location altogether. “The people that you had to go through to film there were difficult to deal with,” Gremillion says. “So we kinda backed away from it, cause they just made it kind of impossible.”

ABC Photo Archives / Getty Images

Malibou Lake Mountain Club

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If you’re looking to step into the fictional world of Twin Peaks, there’s no better place in LA than Malibou Lake Mountain Club. “Basically that was Twin Peaks’ exterior,” says Gremillion. Among the locations shot at the ritzy private club and its surrounding area were the Timber Falls Motel, Easter Park (including the gazebo where Maddy poses as Laura), One Eyed Jack’s, and some exteriors of the Twin Peaks Sheriff’s Department.

Also, the spot where Maddy’s plastic-wrapped body was discovered in the Season 2 episode “Drive with a Dead Girl” is located on the shores of the creek that feeds into Malibu Lake.

Screengrab via ABC

The Old Place restaurant

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The appropriately-rustic and isolated Mulholland Highway haunt and its adjacent barn (now a wine-tasting room) doubled for the Book House, the headquarters of the secret society charged with warding off evil supernatural forces in Twin Peaks.

“We filmed all around the exterior,” says Gremillion, who noted that the restaurant has changed quite a bit since the early ’90s. “It wasn’t anything like it is now, which is a very well-organized, very well-run and very hip place.”

Via Google Maps

Monrovia Bakery

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There are many, many donuts in the Twin Peaks sheriff’s station, but nary a scene taking place inside an actual donut shop—at least none that made the final cut. While a scene filmed in the old-timey (now closed) Monrovia Bakery was snipped from the series’ second episode on its original airing, those who own the Twin Peaks Gold Box DVD set can see it in all its glory as a deleted scene.

Via Google Maps, Getty Images

Burbank Water and Power (Twin Peaks Power Plant)

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If you’re searching for excitement and intrigue, look no further than the…uh, Burbank Department of Water and Power. It is here, after all, where Jacques Renault was ambushed, shot, and arrested by the Twin Peaks Sheriff’s Department in the Season 1 episode entitled “Bite the Bullet, Baby.”

Screengrab via ABC

Rock Store

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Biker hangouts don’t get much more “Hollywood” than the Rock Store, where celebrity motorcycle enthusiasts like Jay Leno and Arnold Schwarzenegger are known to be regulars. In Twin Peaks, the location doubled for a couple of decidedly less-glamorous locations: namely, Lydecker Veterinary Clinic and the adjacent Quik Stop gas station.

Gremillion, who himself visited the establishment just recently, noted that it’s basically the same place it was when they filmed there over 25 years ago. “It has not changed really very much at all, interior or exterior,” he says.

Screengrab via ABC

Franklin Canyon Park

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Along with Malibou Lake Mountain Club, Franklin Canyon Park served as one of the production’s major hubs for exterior shooting—particularly those taking place in the spooky woods around Twin Peaks. Among other things, it is home to Glastonbury Grove, the forest clearing where unlucky visitors enter the hellish Black Lodge.

Gremillion had a real-life brush with danger there one night when, after being tasked with quieting down a group of partying teenagers during filming, he and a P.A. were attacked with rocks, bottles and fists. Upon learning of the incident, Lynch responded pretty much the way you’d expect him to by exclaiming: “Golly gee, that sounds terrible!’”

Screengrab via ABC

Bronson Caves (The Owl Cave)

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The ever-popular Bronson Caves—the site of the original Batcave—have been used by countless productions over the years, including John Ford’s The Searchers, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, and various Star Trek productions. In Twin Peaks, they doubled for Owl Cave, where Deputy Andy inadvertently discovers the map that leads Cooper and company to Glastonbury Grove.

Via ABC screengrab, Horrortaxi / Flickr creative commons

Santa Susana Cantina

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This Simi Valley watering hole has been closed for several years now, but the Old West-style facade that doubled for Wallie’s Hideout—the bar where James first meets the wealthy and mysterious Evelyn Marsh—remains. If you’re looking to make a day out of it, a nearby location is similarly rich in Hollywood history.

“Right around the corner from the Cantina is an entire film complex hidden back by the old Corriganville Park,” Gremillion pointed out. Indeed, the park he refers to is the site of the old Corriganville Movie Ranch, though film buffs should note that only the foundations of the original structures remain

Screengrab via ABC

The Hayward House

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While it looks like a house straight out of the Pacific Northwest, the bucolic Hayward homestead is actually located on a quiet suburban street in Monrovia. But don’t bother trying to peek inside, as the house was used for exterior shooting only. After filming inside a Seattle-area residence for the pilot, that home’s interiors were reportedly recreated on a LA soundstage for the remainder of the series.

Screengrab via ABC

Whiteman Airport (Black Lake Airport)

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Audrey Horne came close to joining the Mile High Club during a scene filmed at this small Pacoima airport, in which the teenage misfit loses her virginity to her departing lover Jack.

Screengrab via ABC

Olive View UCLA Medical Center (Dead Dog Farm)

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“We filmed a lot in the ruins,” says Gremillion, of the old Sylmar hospital, which was heavily damaged in the 1971 San Fernando earthquake and eventually demolished. Most prominently, a dilapidated shack on the property doubled for Dead Dog Farm, a hub of illegal activity where Cooper kills Jean Renault in a gun battle in the Season 2 episode “Checkmate.” Amazingly, some of the ruins remain in a lot adjacent to the rebuilt hospital, which opened its doors in 1987.

Screengrab via ABC

Roger Jessup Park

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It’s somewhat surprising that this small city park near Whiteman Airport doubled for the forests of northern Washington, but, according to Gremillion, the decision was merely a practical one. “We wouldn’t go there unless we had a day at the airport,” he says. “Scenes that were exterior wooded scenes that we needed to fit in without traveling all the way from there to Franklin Canyon.”

Marsh mansion

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The mansion where Evelyn Marsh resides has been an exceedingly popular filming location over the years, with episodes of series including Falcon Crest, Beverly Hills, 90210, Melrose Place and Alias all having shot there. “The guy that owned it had it really rigged for filming,” says Gremillion. “I mean, he knew what we needed and took great pains to make sure that we were able to do what we needed to do.” (Hot tip: The gated mansion used as Cher’s house in Clueless is located just down the road.)

Marsh mansion
Screen grab via ABC

The Four Aces Movie Ranch

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The South Dakota motel where Darya (Nicole LaLiberte) meets her untimely end at the hands of Mr. C, a.k.a. Evil Dale Cooper, is in fact the Four Aces Movie Ranch in Palmdale, described on its official website as a “classic Americana road stop set” that also features a diner, gas station and bar/casino. With its rich wood paneling and middle-of-nowhere feel, it’s a location perfectly suited to noir-drenched murder and mayhem. Sadly for us lay-folk, the charmingly-moody rooms are strictly reserved for Hollywood production purposes and not open to the general public.

Via Google Maps and Showtime

Bill Hastings’s house

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School principal/double-murder suspect Bill Hastings’ (Matthew Lillard) cozy South Dakota home is actually located in Altadena, whose leafy streets nicely double for more verdant regions of the country. Unfortunately for Bill, the house's deep front lawn and lengthy brick walkway make it an especially long and torturous journey from porch to police car.

Via Google Maps and Showtime

Dougie Jones/Dale Cooper switch

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Palmdale is the home of fictional tract development Rancho Rosa, where Dale Cooper doppelganger Dougie Jones is swapped out for his lookalike in nauseating fashion. The anonymous, ticky-tacky neighborhood's banal aesthetic somehow makes Cooper’s bizarre reappearance feel even more disorienting.

Via Google Maps and Showtime

Dougie Jones's house

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The house with the red door on Lancelot Court is actually located on Huston Street in Stevenson Ranch, a master-planned community that also served as Mary-Louise Parker's 'hood on Showtime's Weeds. It is here where Dale Cooper arrives in Episode 4 after being mistaken for his doppelganger Dougie Jones, whose seemingly-mundane personality mirrors the cookie-cutter exterior of the home he shares with his wife Janey-E (Naomi Watts).

Via Google Maps and Showtime

General William J. Fox Airfield

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A number of LA locations stand in for South Dakota in the new episodes, including this small Lancaster airport and its adjacent restaurant Foxy's Landing. Gordon Cole (Lynch), Albert Rosenfield (Miguel Ferrer) and Cole's new partner Tamara Preston (Chrysta Bell) arrive at (and later depart from) this desolate airstrip during their trip to meet Mr. C, Dale Cooper's evil double.

Via Google Maps and Showtime

Casey's Irish Pub

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Albert Rosenfield (Miguel Ferrer) uncovers the mysterious Diane (Laura Dern) at this downtown institution, which stands in for a Philadelphia bar named Max Von's in Episode 6. Now I guess we know where she's been hiding all these years ...

Screengrab via Showtime

Hollywood Premiere Motel

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We first meet ice-pick-wielding assassin Ike "The Spike" Stadtler (Christophe Zajac-Denek) at this Thai Town motel that stands in for a Vegas motor lodge. Literally nothing about this place screams "luxury"—but Ike isn't there for the ambiance.

Via Google Maps

Lake Balboa/Anthony C. Beilenson Park

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A relaxing day of paddleboating wasn't on the agenda for Janey-E (Naomi Watts) when she visited this lakefront Van Nuys park (standing in for a Las Vegas playground) in Episode 6. Instead, the nervy wife and mother chose it as the location to deliver her "99 percent" monologue to Dougie's dubious creditors (and also pay them off with a tightly-wound wad of cash).

Via Google Maps

Dougie Jones's office

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Before you race over to this office park for a photo op with that stoic cowboy statue, you should know that it was created specifically for the series and no longer resides there. Ditto the nearby art installation that looks like a giant soft-serve sundae, which was apparently draped over a more mundane metal sculpture.

Via Google Maps and Showtime

Newcomb’s Ranch Restaurant & Bar

Via Google Maps

This biker-beloved institution along the scenic Angeles Crest Highway has been described as a “rustic roadhouse” by the Los Angeles Times, so it’s not hard to see why it was chosen as the site of Big Ed’s Gas Farm after the pilot episode. Twin Peaks Season 2 location manager Barry Gremillion praises the restaurant for its “old-fashioned” allure, saying: “It can be anything. Gas station, roadhouse, bar…” Heck, maybe even a drape store.

Via Google Maps

Ennis House

Via edward stojakovic / Flickr creative commons

This striking, oft-filmed “textile block” home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright was the location used for Invitation to Love, the soap-within-a-soap that often mirrored the plot twists happening in the town of Twin Peaks. With its theatrical granite architecture and sweeping views of the LA basin, it’s the perfect backdrop for over-the-top melodrama.

Via edward stojakovic / Flickr creative commons

Sierra Madre Pioneer Cemetery

ABC Photo Archives / Getty Images

The doomed Laura Palmer was laid to rest at this suburban cemetery—fitting, given what Gremillion termed a “woodsy,” “very Twin Peaksy” vibe. The cemetery was used later on in the series, but locals eventually made things so difficult that the production began to second-guess the location altogether. “The people that you had to go through to film there were difficult to deal with,” Gremillion says. “So we kinda backed away from it, cause they just made it kind of impossible.”

ABC Photo Archives / Getty Images

Malibou Lake Mountain Club

Screengrab via ABC

If you’re looking to step into the fictional world of Twin Peaks, there’s no better place in LA than Malibou Lake Mountain Club. “Basically that was Twin Peaks’ exterior,” says Gremillion. Among the locations shot at the ritzy private club and its surrounding area were the Timber Falls Motel, Easter Park (including the gazebo where Maddy poses as Laura), One Eyed Jack’s, and some exteriors of the Twin Peaks Sheriff’s Department.

Also, the spot where Maddy’s plastic-wrapped body was discovered in the Season 2 episode “Drive with a Dead Girl” is located on the shores of the creek that feeds into Malibu Lake.

Screengrab via ABC

The Old Place restaurant

Via Google Maps

The appropriately-rustic and isolated Mulholland Highway haunt and its adjacent barn (now a wine-tasting room) doubled for the Book House, the headquarters of the secret society charged with warding off evil supernatural forces in Twin Peaks.

“We filmed all around the exterior,” says Gremillion, who noted that the restaurant has changed quite a bit since the early ’90s. “It wasn’t anything like it is now, which is a very well-organized, very well-run and very hip place.”

Via Google Maps

Monrovia Bakery

Via Google Maps, Getty Images

There are many, many donuts in the Twin Peaks sheriff’s station, but nary a scene taking place inside an actual donut shop—at least none that made the final cut. While a scene filmed in the old-timey (now closed) Monrovia Bakery was snipped from the series’ second episode on its original airing, those who own the Twin Peaks Gold Box DVD set can see it in all its glory as a deleted scene.

Via Google Maps, Getty Images

Burbank Water and Power (Twin Peaks Power Plant)

Screengrab via ABC

If you’re searching for excitement and intrigue, look no further than the…uh, Burbank Department of Water and Power. It is here, after all, where Jacques Renault was ambushed, shot, and arrested by the Twin Peaks Sheriff’s Department in the Season 1 episode entitled “Bite the Bullet, Baby.”

Screengrab via ABC

Rock Store

Screengrab via ABC

Biker hangouts don’t get much more “Hollywood” than the Rock Store, where celebrity motorcycle enthusiasts like Jay Leno and Arnold Schwarzenegger are known to be regulars. In Twin Peaks, the location doubled for a couple of decidedly less-glamorous locations: namely, Lydecker Veterinary Clinic and the adjacent Quik Stop gas station.

Gremillion, who himself visited the establishment just recently, noted that it’s basically the same place it was when they filmed there over 25 years ago. “It has not changed really very much at all, interior or exterior,” he says.

Screengrab via ABC

Franklin Canyon Park

Screengrab via ABC

Along with Malibou Lake Mountain Club, Franklin Canyon Park served as one of the production’s major hubs for exterior shooting—particularly those taking place in the spooky woods around Twin Peaks. Among other things, it is home to Glastonbury Grove, the forest clearing where unlucky visitors enter the hellish Black Lodge.

Gremillion had a real-life brush with danger there one night when, after being tasked with quieting down a group of partying teenagers during filming, he and a P.A. were attacked with rocks, bottles and fists. Upon learning of the incident, Lynch responded pretty much the way you’d expect him to by exclaiming: “Golly gee, that sounds terrible!’”

Screengrab via ABC

Bronson Caves (The Owl Cave)

Via ABC screengrab, Horrortaxi / Flickr creative commons

The ever-popular Bronson Caves—the site of the original Batcave—have been used by countless productions over the years, including John Ford’s The Searchers, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, and various Star Trek productions. In Twin Peaks, they doubled for Owl Cave, where Deputy Andy inadvertently discovers the map that leads Cooper and company to Glastonbury Grove.

Via ABC screengrab, Horrortaxi / Flickr creative commons

Santa Susana Cantina

Screengrab via ABC

This Simi Valley watering hole has been closed for several years now, but the Old West-style facade that doubled for Wallie’s Hideout—the bar where James first meets the wealthy and mysterious Evelyn Marsh—remains. If you’re looking to make a day out of it, a nearby location is similarly rich in Hollywood history.

“Right around the corner from the Cantina is an entire film complex hidden back by the old Corriganville Park,” Gremillion pointed out. Indeed, the park he refers to is the site of the old Corriganville Movie Ranch, though film buffs should note that only the foundations of the original structures remain

Screengrab via ABC

The Hayward House