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Map: Finding Old Hollywood Glamour Buried in LA's Koreatown

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Hollywood has become a pale ghost of the glistening, glamorous oasis it once was. The majority of the legendary locales that put the place on the map have been demolished, transformed into shrines to L. Ron Hubbard, or converted into bong retailers and fashion-victim-filled night clubs. Where the famously opulent Hollywood Hotel once stood, the Hollywood & Highland Center has taken its place, peddling unethically manufactured clothing and deep-fried foods to tourists. Schwab's is now a Starbucks. And so on, and so on.

If you want to surround yourself with the old school charm that defined Hollywood during its glory days, you're gonna have to schlep east. You're gonna have to go to—suspend your disbelief—Koreatown. LA's old landmarks and classic haunts still exist there, in spite of it all. —Megan Koester

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1. The Prince

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3198 West 7th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90005

The Prince opened as The Windsor in 1927; while it’s now a Korean bar and restaurant specializing in pitchers of Hite and egregiously large servings of fried chicken, it has nevertheless retained its dim lighting and red booths of the past, making it a coveted filming location for shows like Mad Men.

2. Bullocks Wilshire

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3050 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90005

The sister location of Downtown’s Bullocks department store, which specialized in more luxury goods, this circa-1929 structure was one of the first Art Deco buildings in America. As luxury retailers moved to the west side in the ‘70s and ‘80s, Bullocks Wilshire fell out of favor and was eventually acquired by Macy’s (très gauche!). After suffering damage in the LA Riots, it closed in 1993—then was purchased by Southwestern Law School in 1994 (only in LA could a law school be housed in a former department store) and restored back to its former glory.[Image via Nardella Photo Album]

3. The HMS Bounty

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3357 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90010

Located across from the now-demolished Ambassador Hotel, this watering hole at the bottom of the Gaylord (where Richard Nixon and Winston Churchill, two great tastes that taste great together, once kept apartments) was built in 1926 and internally resembles the interior of a ship (albeit a ship filled with degenerate alcoholics). [Image via Chris]

4. The Wiltern

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3790 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90010

Built in 1931, the former Warner Brothers Western Theater (which was the flagship of the chain) sits at the very edge of Koreatown. After nearly being demolished twice in the ‘70s, it was declared an LA Historic-Cultural Monument and now houses service-fee-laden Live Nation concerts. Oh, and it has a killer powder room. Hey, ladies![Image via Mark Luethi]

5. Chapman Plaza

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3465 West 6th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90020

The first drive-in market in America, Chapman Plaza was built in 1928 and restored to its Spanish revival roots in 1990. While none of the ‘20s-era businesses still occupy the space (rather, it now houses a number of Korean eateries and beauty shops), and it’s been covered in horrible Christmas lights, it’s still an architectural marvel.

6. Talmadge Apartments

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3278 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90010

Silent film siren Norma Talmadge’s old man built this tastefully ostentatious apartment building for her in 1924—it’s since been restored to Deco-era specifications and still houses tenants. For two grand, you can get yourself a glam one bedroom apartment on one of the building’s higher floors, giving you an amazing view of the charmless office building that’s since been erected across the street. [Image via Michael Locke]

7. Taylor’s Steakhouse

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3361 West 8th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90005

Established in 1953 as Taylor’s Tavern, this award-winning steakhouse (which relocated from Olympic and Western to Eighth Street in 1970) is cheaper and, with its leather booths and old Vegas vibe, vastly more charming than Ruth’s Chris. Hell—it’s cheaper than Black Angus, even. Although, sadly, meals do not come with a “Mountain of Fudge Cake.”

8. Wilshire Galleria

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3240 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90010

Located three blocks west of Bullocks Wilshire, this all-marble former I. Magnin department store cost $3 million to build in 1939. Designed by Myron Hunt, who also designed the Ambassador Hotel, it’s now a Korean shopping center, but still maintains some of its classic Art Deco elements, like a grand chandelier in the main shopping area.

9. R Bar

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3331 West 8th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90005

While R Bar technically isn't ancient, it sure as hell acts like it. The pseudo-speakeasy requires a password for entrance (check their Facebook page before showing up), and its cozy, wooden interior is dimly lit by a smattering of chandeliers. Modern conveniences include a jukebox and karaoke and comedy nights.

10. Brown Derby Plaza

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3377 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90010

The structure of the legendary Brown Derby restaurant, which has been painted a nauseating shade of pink and now rests, shuttered, atop a strip mall, stands as a testament to the fact that sometimes it’s better to demolish than denigrate a historical artifact. Below it sits an (also shuttered) all-you-can-drink bar called the Hangover, which failed for obvious reasons.

1. The Prince

3198 West 7th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90005

The Prince opened as The Windsor in 1927; while it’s now a Korean bar and restaurant specializing in pitchers of Hite and egregiously large servings of fried chicken, it has nevertheless retained its dim lighting and red booths of the past, making it a coveted filming location for shows like Mad Men.

3198 West 7th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90005

2. Bullocks Wilshire

3050 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90005

The sister location of Downtown’s Bullocks department store, which specialized in more luxury goods, this circa-1929 structure was one of the first Art Deco buildings in America. As luxury retailers moved to the west side in the ‘70s and ‘80s, Bullocks Wilshire fell out of favor and was eventually acquired by Macy’s (très gauche!). After suffering damage in the LA Riots, it closed in 1993—then was purchased by Southwestern Law School in 1994 (only in LA could a law school be housed in a former department store) and restored back to its former glory.[Image via Nardella Photo Album]

3050 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90005

3. The HMS Bounty

3357 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90010

Located across from the now-demolished Ambassador Hotel, this watering hole at the bottom of the Gaylord (where Richard Nixon and Winston Churchill, two great tastes that taste great together, once kept apartments) was built in 1926 and internally resembles the interior of a ship (albeit a ship filled with degenerate alcoholics). [Image via Chris]

3357 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90010

4. The Wiltern

3790 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90010

Built in 1931, the former Warner Brothers Western Theater (which was the flagship of the chain) sits at the very edge of Koreatown. After nearly being demolished twice in the ‘70s, it was declared an LA Historic-Cultural Monument and now houses service-fee-laden Live Nation concerts. Oh, and it has a killer powder room. Hey, ladies![Image via Mark Luethi]

3790 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90010

5. Chapman Plaza

3465 West 6th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90020

The first drive-in market in America, Chapman Plaza was built in 1928 and restored to its Spanish revival roots in 1990. While none of the ‘20s-era businesses still occupy the space (rather, it now houses a number of Korean eateries and beauty shops), and it’s been covered in horrible Christmas lights, it’s still an architectural marvel.

3465 West 6th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90020

6. Talmadge Apartments

3278 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90010

Silent film siren Norma Talmadge’s old man built this tastefully ostentatious apartment building for her in 1924—it’s since been restored to Deco-era specifications and still houses tenants. For two grand, you can get yourself a glam one bedroom apartment on one of the building’s higher floors, giving you an amazing view of the charmless office building that’s since been erected across the street. [Image via Michael Locke]

3278 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90010

7. Taylor’s Steakhouse

3361 West 8th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90005

Established in 1953 as Taylor’s Tavern, this award-winning steakhouse (which relocated from Olympic and Western to Eighth Street in 1970) is cheaper and, with its leather booths and old Vegas vibe, vastly more charming than Ruth’s Chris. Hell—it’s cheaper than Black Angus, even. Although, sadly, meals do not come with a “Mountain of Fudge Cake.”

3361 West 8th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90005

8. Wilshire Galleria

3240 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90010

Located three blocks west of Bullocks Wilshire, this all-marble former I. Magnin department store cost $3 million to build in 1939. Designed by Myron Hunt, who also designed the Ambassador Hotel, it’s now a Korean shopping center, but still maintains some of its classic Art Deco elements, like a grand chandelier in the main shopping area.

3240 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90010

9. R Bar

3331 West 8th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90005

While R Bar technically isn't ancient, it sure as hell acts like it. The pseudo-speakeasy requires a password for entrance (check their Facebook page before showing up), and its cozy, wooden interior is dimly lit by a smattering of chandeliers. Modern conveniences include a jukebox and karaoke and comedy nights.

3331 West 8th Street
Los Angeles, CA 90005

10. Brown Derby Plaza

3377 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90010

The structure of the legendary Brown Derby restaurant, which has been painted a nauseating shade of pink and now rests, shuttered, atop a strip mall, stands as a testament to the fact that sometimes it’s better to demolish than denigrate a historical artifact. Below it sits an (also shuttered) all-you-can-drink bar called the Hangover, which failed for obvious reasons.

3377 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90010