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An aerial view of Los Angeles. There are many buildings of varying heights. Rendering via Department of City Planning

Mapping the Arts District's never-ending parade of development

23 projects in the pipeline right now for one of DTLA's hottest neighborhoods

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For most of this decade, the Arts District—a once grungy neighborhood where artists could rent ramshackle studios for as little as $150—has been an irresistible magnet for builders.

With some of the biggest projects already complete, the pace of construction has lulled over the past few months. Row DTLA is welcoming shoppers, Warner Music Group has moved into the old Ford Factory, and the old Coca Cola building has been converted into creative offices.

But the development pipeline is still full. There are nearly two dozen projects planned for the area. If ultimately built, they’d bring more than 5,000 new apartments and condos, along with hundreds of hotel rooms and more offices and shops.

This map tracks most of the major projects in the works for the area right now.

Interested in monitoring the changing landscapes of other Los Angeles neighborhoods? Here are some other development maps:

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520 Mateo

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The number of live/work lofts planned for this project, first revealed in 2016, has shrunk. But the tower has tripled in height. The development is now set to hold 475 lofts—instead of 600—and rise 35 stories high—instead of 13. Developer Carmel Partners has said it plans to start construction in 2020.

An aerial view of Los Angeles. There are many buildings of varying heights. Rendering via Department of City Planning

Development atop the Regional Connector’s Little Tokyo/Arts District station

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Metro is looking for developers to build something on the site above the future Little Tokyo/Arts District subway station on the Regional Connector. Metro launched the search for a developer for the to-be-decided project last year.

Developer Sun Cal’s Herzog & de Meuron-designed project will undoubtedly reshape the Arts District in much the same that the One Santa Fe Complex did upon opening in 2014. In addition to twin 58-story towers, the staggeringly massive project will add 1,736 new residences, two hotels, 23,000 square feet of “art opportunity space,” creative offices, a school, and two parks.

A rendering of 6AM in the Arts District of Los Angeles. There are people walking down a path between two rose of buildings. There is tree in the foreground. Courtesy of SunCal

670 Mesquit

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The Gallo family, which owns a cold storage facility along the LA River, is pairing with V.E. Equities to put an incredible development in the AD. Designed by architect Bjarke Ingels, the project would include two boutique hotels with about 225 rooms, 800,000 square feet of creative office space, about 250 residential units, shops, and open space along the river.

Construction was expected to begin as soon as this year, with completion slated for sometime between 2022 and 2040. (The huge range is accounting for the possibility that the project could be built in phases.)

A rendering of the Mesquit project designed by Bjarke Ingels. There are a group of buildings with glass facades. A courtyard is in the center of the buildings. Courtesy of Bjarke Ingels Group

405 S. Hewitt St

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This 11-story creative office campus will hover dramatically over the A+D Museum, a low-rise brick building at Fourth and Colyton streets. The project from Legendary Developments would also put a courtyard in front of the museum on Colyton.

The exterior of a creative office campus in Los Angeles. The facade is glass and the lower level has multiple structural beams. Courtesy of Legendary Developments

668 Alameda

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In October, the Los Angeles City Council approved this project, which will replace an old cold storage building with 475 live-work apartments and 45,500 square feet of commercial space.

Engineered by developer AvalonBay Communities and designed by R&A Architecture + Design, the mixed-use project is located right across the street from the Row DTLA complex. Construction is expected to begin this year.

The exterior of 668 Alameda in Los Angeles. The facade is tan with multiple windows. Courtesy AvalonBay Communities

Bay Street mixed-use project

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In 2015, LA-based Bay Capital Fund dropped $11.5 million on a 2-acre parking lot directly east of the forthcoming Soho House, with plans to turn the site into a big mixed-use complex with 110 live-work units and a shed-like structure that will house retail and restaurant space. A draft environmental impact report for the project was released in November. The report estimated work on 2110 Bay would begin this July.

A rendering of the Bay Street mixed use project in Los Angeles. There are a row of buildings with glass facades. The glass buildings are surrounded by various other buildings. Courtesy of Studio One Eleven

Sixth Street Viaduct

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Designed by HNTB with an assist from One Santa Fe architect Michael Maltzan, the wavy new bridge will have dedicated bike paths and 60-foot-tall arches when it opens in 2020. A new park is planned beneath it.

A viaduct spanning over a road. The viaduct has arches. There are city buildings in the distance. Via Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project

Soho Warehouse

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The Arts District’s most exclusive new joint will be Soho Warehouse, a members-only club that will include a 1,500-square-foot performance space, a 14,000-square foot public market, a rooftop pool and observation deck, and 36 guest rooms. Last year, Curbed LA reported that the club’s opening had been pushed to mid-2018 at least. A new opening date has not been announced.

Row DTLA

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Atlas Capital Group, owners of the Arts District-adjacent complex formerly known as Alameda Square (and home to the American Apparel factory), have rebranded the site as Row DTLA—a massive facility housing offices, creative space, luxury retail and restaurants, and the popular weekend food pop-up Smorgasburg. The complex holds tenants from tech firms to eateries with more moving in in gradual waves.

Colyton live/work complex

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This site will soon give way to a 310-unit development with 11,375 square feet of commercial space. The project site is conveniently located next to the Arts District’s new park.

The exterior of the Colyton live/work complex. There is a grey fence and a building behind it that is white and grey. Google Maps

Challenge Cream and Butter Building

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The Arts District seems to be the new place to put your private club. In addition to Soho Warehouse, an exclusive club is planned for this 1920s commercial building. A gym, pool, and office space are also part of the project, which will add an additional three stories to the building. The project received planning commission approval in the summer of 2017.

An aerial exterior view of the Challenge Cream and Butter building in Los Angeles. The top of the building is glass. The lower level is white. There are trees in front of the building. Via Department of City Planning

Santa Fe Business Center

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If you needed any further indication that the AD’s bohemian vibe is going a bit corporate, look no further than this four-story structure that will bring a little less than 75,000 square feet of new office space to the area.

The exterior of the Santa Fe business center in Los Angeles. Via Department of City Planning

330 Alameda

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This seven-story development is set to include 186 live-work units, 22,000 square feet of retail space, and a garage that will fit more than 400 cars. Currently, the project site is home to a low-rise office building.

The exterior of 330 Alameda in Los Angeles. The building is grey and behind a fence. Google Maps

AMP Lofts

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A residential project years in the making, the latest version of this mixed-user calls for lots of open space, 320 live/work apartments, a communal artisan workshop, and, of course, a dog run. Building permits were issued for the site in January 2017, city records show, and work appears to be nearing completion. The project is designed by Steinberg Architects with Shimoda Design Group.

The exterior of AMP lofts. The building is adjacent to a street with moving traffic. Courtesy of Steinberg Architects

Industrial

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Designed by Lorcan O‘Herlihy Architects, this brick-and-metal-covered mixed-user will hold 360 residential units and underground parking (with two levels above ground).

The exterior of two buildings in Los Angeles on Industrial street. The facades are brick and metal. Renderings by Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects via Department of City Planning

Violet Street project

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This nine-story mixed-user planned for the site of a recycling facility will primarily consist of offices and street-level retail. The huge murals slated to adorn the building’s exterior might attract some pretty hip corporate tenants. The project is forging ahead; its draft environmental impact report was released at the beginning of the month.

The exterior of the Violet street project in Los Angeles. The facade is white with multiple windows. Courtesy of Lowe Enterprises

Alameda hotel project

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This development is an adaptive reuse project that doesn’t include any live-work units or creative office space. Instead, developers of the site plan to turn the old brick industrial building into a 66-room hotel. It’ll join the American Hotel on Hewitt as one of the few places in the neighborhood for young, hip out-of-towners to crash for the night.

The exterior of the Alameda hotel project. The facade is red brick. Department of City Planning

641 Imperial

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Developed by billionaire art collector Adam Lindemann, the 12-story mixed-use project will be called 641. The building will contain 140 live-work lofts, 7,000 square feet of street-level retail and art space, with 7,000 square feet of creative office space on the second floor. A four-level underground garage will provide 162 parking spaces.

The exterior of 641 Imperial in Los Angeles. The facade is tan brick with a geometric structure. Courtesy of Johnson Fain

Art Share LA

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The arts nonprofit’s headquarters is getting a renovation courtesy of Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects. The upgrades will improve the flow of the space and create flexible space for galleries and performances. The renovations will recapture 30 percent of the building’s available square footage, LOHA says.

The exterior of Art Share Los Angeles. The facade has a painted mural on the outer walls. Courtesy of Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects

Lofts at California Walnut Growers’s Association

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The former headquarters and packing house of the California Walnut Growers’s Association is being retrofitted and converted into lofts, offices, and retail. The number of units in the 1921 building is unclear, but there’s a plan to add balconies, underground parking, and fun rooftop outdoor spaces.

The exterior of the Lofts at California Walnut Grower’s Association. The facade is red brick with multiple windows. Courtesy of The Hillcrest Company

1800 E 7th Street

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Announced in 2017, the seven-story development on Seventh Street will hold 122 residential units (14 of them for very low-income tenants) and commercial space for art production and galleries. Renderings by HansonLA show balconies and a shared courtyard for residents.

The exterior of 1800 east seventh street in Los Angeles. The facade is grey brick with yellow and red decorative geometric patterns. Courtesy of HansonLA

2053 E 7th Street

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Developer Ralph Ziman and his company, 1711 Lincoln, LLC are planning to expand and convert an old building and adjoining parking lot at the corner of Seventh Street and Santa Fe Avenue into a hotel with more than 50 rooms and a restaurant and rooftop pool.

The exterior of 2053 east seventh street. The facade is tan brick.

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520 Mateo

The number of live/work lofts planned for this project, first revealed in 2016, has shrunk. But the tower has tripled in height. The development is now set to hold 475 lofts—instead of 600—and rise 35 stories high—instead of 13. Developer Carmel Partners has said it plans to start construction in 2020.

An aerial view of Los Angeles. There are many buildings of varying heights. Rendering via Department of City Planning

Development atop the Regional Connector’s Little Tokyo/Arts District station

Metro is looking for developers to build something on the site above the future Little Tokyo/Arts District subway station on the Regional Connector. Metro launched the search for a developer for the to-be-decided project last year.

6AM

Developer Sun Cal’s Herzog & de Meuron-designed project will undoubtedly reshape the Arts District in much the same that the One Santa Fe Complex did upon opening in 2014. In addition to twin 58-story towers, the staggeringly massive project will add 1,736 new residences, two hotels, 23,000 square feet of “art opportunity space,” creative offices, a school, and two parks.

A rendering of 6AM in the Arts District of Los Angeles. There are people walking down a path between two rose of buildings. There is tree in the foreground. Courtesy of SunCal

670 Mesquit

The Gallo family, which owns a cold storage facility along the LA River, is pairing with V.E. Equities to put an incredible development in the AD. Designed by architect Bjarke Ingels, the project would include two boutique hotels with about 225 rooms, 800,000 square feet of creative office space, about 250 residential units, shops, and open space along the river.

Construction was expected to begin as soon as this year, with completion slated for sometime between 2022 and 2040. (The huge range is accounting for the possibility that the project could be built in phases.)

A rendering of the Mesquit project designed by Bjarke Ingels. There are a group of buildings with glass facades. A courtyard is in the center of the buildings. Courtesy of Bjarke Ingels Group

405 S. Hewitt St

This 11-story creative office campus will hover dramatically over the A+D Museum, a low-rise brick building at Fourth and Colyton streets. The project from Legendary Developments would also put a courtyard in front of the museum on Colyton.

The exterior of a creative office campus in Los Angeles. The facade is glass and the lower level has multiple structural beams. Courtesy of Legendary Developments

668 Alameda

In October, the Los Angeles City Council approved this project, which will replace an old cold storage building with 475 live-work apartments and 45,500 square feet of commercial space.

Engineered by developer AvalonBay Communities and designed by R&A Architecture + Design, the mixed-use project is located right across the street from the Row DTLA complex. Construction is expected to begin this year.

The exterior of 668 Alameda in Los Angeles. The facade is tan with multiple windows. Courtesy AvalonBay Communities

Bay Street mixed-use project

In 2015, LA-based Bay Capital Fund dropped $11.5 million on a 2-acre parking lot directly east of the forthcoming Soho House, with plans to turn the site into a big mixed-use complex with 110 live-work units and a shed-like structure that will house retail and restaurant space. A draft environmental impact report for the project was released in November. The report estimated work on 2110 Bay would begin this July.

A rendering of the Bay Street mixed use project in Los Angeles. There are a row of buildings with glass facades. The glass buildings are surrounded by various other buildings. Courtesy of Studio One Eleven

Sixth Street Viaduct

Designed by HNTB with an assist from One Santa Fe architect Michael Maltzan, the wavy new bridge will have dedicated bike paths and 60-foot-tall arches when it opens in 2020. A new park is planned beneath it.

A viaduct spanning over a road. The viaduct has arches. There are city buildings in the distance. Via Sixth Street Viaduct Replacement Project

Soho Warehouse

The Arts District’s most exclusive new joint will be Soho Warehouse, a members-only club that will include a 1,500-square-foot performance space, a 14,000-square foot public market, a rooftop pool and observation deck, and 36 guest rooms. Last year, Curbed LA reported that the club’s opening had been pushed to mid-2018 at least. A new opening date has not been announced.

Row DTLA

Atlas Capital Group, owners of the Arts District-adjacent complex formerly known as Alameda Square (and home to the American Apparel factory), have rebranded the site as Row DTLA—a massive facility housing offices, creative space, luxury retail and restaurants, and the popular weekend food pop-up Smorgasburg. The complex holds tenants from tech firms to eateries with more moving in in gradual waves.

Colyton live/work complex

This site will soon give way to a 310-unit development with 11,375 square feet of commercial space. The project site is conveniently located next to the Arts District’s new park.

The exterior of the Colyton live/work complex. There is a grey fence and a building behind it that is white and grey. Google Maps

Challenge Cream and Butter Building

The Arts District seems to be the new place to put your private club. In addition to Soho Warehouse, an exclusive club is planned for this 1920s commercial building. A gym, pool, and office space are also part of the project, which will add an additional three stories to the building. The project received planning commission approval in the summer of 2017.

An aerial exterior view of the Challenge Cream and Butter building in Los Angeles. The top of the building is glass. The lower level is white. There are trees in front of the building. Via Department of City Planning

Santa Fe Business Center

If you needed any further indication that the AD’s bohemian vibe is going a bit corporate, look no further than this four-story structure that will bring a little less than 75,000 square feet of new office space to the area.

The exterior of the Santa Fe business center in Los Angeles. Via Department of City Planning

330 Alameda

This seven-story development is set to include 186 live-work units, 22,000 square feet of retail space, and a garage that will fit more than 400 cars. Currently, the project site is home to a low-rise office building.

The exterior of 330 Alameda in Los Angeles. The building is grey and behind a fence. Google Maps

AMP Lofts

A residential project years in the making, the latest version of this mixed-user calls for lots of open space, 320 live/work apartments, a communal artisan workshop, and, of course, a dog run. Building permits were issued for the site in January 2017, city records show, and work appears to be nearing completion. The project is designed by Steinberg Architects with Shimoda Design Group.

The exterior of AMP lofts. The building is adjacent to a street with moving traffic. Courtesy of Steinberg Architects

Industrial

Designed by Lorcan O‘Herlihy Architects, this brick-and-metal-covered mixed-user will hold 360 residential units and underground parking (with two levels above ground).

The exterior of two buildings in Los Angeles on Industrial street. The facades are brick and metal. Renderings by Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects via Department of City Planning

Violet Street project

This nine-story mixed-user planned for the site of a recycling facility will primarily consist of offices and street-level retail. The huge murals slated to adorn the building’s exterior might attract some pretty hip corporate tenants. The project is forging ahead; its draft environmental impact report was released at the beginning of the month.

The exterior of the Violet street project in Los Angeles. The facade is white with multiple windows. Courtesy of Lowe Enterprises

Alameda hotel project

This development is an adaptive reuse project that doesn’t include any live-work units or creative office space. Instead, developers of the site plan to turn the old brick industrial building into a 66-room hotel. It’ll join the American Hotel on Hewitt as one of the few places in the neighborhood for young, hip out-of-towners to crash for the night.

The exterior of the Alameda hotel project. The facade is red brick. Department of City Planning

641 Imperial

Developed by billionaire art collector Adam Lindemann, the 12-story mixed-use project will be called 641. The building will contain 140 live-work lofts, 7,000 square feet of street-level retail and art space, with 7,000 square feet of creative office space on the second floor. A four-level underground garage will provide 162 parking spaces.

The exterior of 641 Imperial in Los Angeles. The facade is tan brick with a geometric structure. Courtesy of Johnson Fain

Art Share LA

The arts nonprofit’s headquarters is getting a renovation courtesy of Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects. The upgrades will improve the flow of the space and create flexible space for galleries and performances. The renovations will recapture 30 percent of the building’s available square footage, LOHA says.

The exterior of Art Share Los Angeles. The facade has a painted mural on the outer walls. Courtesy of Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects

Lofts at California Walnut Growers’s Association

The former headquarters and packing house of the California Walnut Growers’s Association is being retrofitted and converted into lofts, offices, and retail. The number of units in the 1921 building is unclear, but there’s a plan to add balconies, underground parking, and fun rooftop outdoor spaces.

The exterior of the Lofts at California Walnut Grower’s Association. The facade is red brick with multiple windows. Courtesy of The Hillcrest Company

1800 E 7th Street

Announced in 2017, the seven-story development on Seventh Street will hold 122 residential units (14 of them for very low-income tenants) and commercial space for art production and galleries. Renderings by HansonLA show balconies and a shared courtyard for residents.

The exterior of 1800 east seventh street in Los Angeles. The facade is grey brick with yellow and red decorative geometric patterns. Courtesy of HansonLA

2053 E 7th Street

Developer Ralph Ziman and his company, 1711 Lincoln, LLC are planning to expand and convert an old building and adjoining parking lot at the corner of Seventh Street and Santa Fe Avenue into a hotel with more than 50 rooms and a restaurant and rooftop pool.

The exterior of 2053 east seventh street. The facade is tan brick.