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A Walking Tour of Architecturally Blessed Mt. Washington

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A little pocket of country in the city, Mount Washington is known for its abundance of parks (such as the 35 acre Elyria Canyon), its steep and winding roads, and its spectacular views. The bucolic neighborhood also boasts a wealth of noteworthy architecture, both vintage and modern, packed into its 1.85 square miles. Our walking tour features 16 points of interest--please note that, with the exception of the Self-Realization Fellowship Center, which is open to the public Tuesday through Sunday till 5 pm, these are private homes.

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The Minster House

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One of the first properties in the City of LA to enact a Mills Act contract, this 1911 Craftsman served as a sanitarium for tuberculosis patients before being purchased by Joseph Minster in 1920. Minster, an LA Times reporter, became known as "the mayor of Mount Washington" thanks to his efforts to improve the neighborhood.

The Birtcher-Share House

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Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument #612, this Frank Lloyd Wright-influenced residence was built in 1942 by Harwell Hamilton Harris.

The Scholfield House

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Los Angeles HCM #613, this compact Usonian home was designed in 1952 by James De Long for local real estate broker Robert Scholfield.

The Wolford House

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Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument #614, this 1949 home was the first independent architectural commission of James De Long, a former apprentice of Frank Lloyd Wright and Taliesin Fellow from 1946 to 1947.

The Mauer House

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Erected in 1947, this home was architect John Lautner’s third residential commission. The exterior is visible from the street, but only through a grim chain link fence.

The J.B. Merrill House

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One of the first three houses built on top of Mt. Washington, this 1909 Craftsman was designed to accommodate a large pipe organ. Owner J.B. Merrill, an accomplished musician, frequently hosted concerts and parties here.

Self-Realization Fellowship HQ

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Designed by Chinese Theater architects Meyer and Holler in 1910, the Mission Revival Mt. Washington Hotel closed down only six years later. In 1925, Paramahansa Yogananda bought it to be the Self-Realization Fellowship's international HQ.

The Pilot House

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This post and beam was built in 1948 by A. Quincy Jones and his Mutual Housing Association partners as a test study for their Crestwood Hills development.

Young Woo House

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Built in 1968 by architect Young Woo as his family residence, this three-bedroom modern just hit the market for the first time. Asking price is $960,000.

The Schmalix Residence

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Designed in 1998 by Fung + Blatt, this industrial-modern structure serves as live/work space for the esteemed Austrian painter Hubert Schmalix

Byler House

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Built by Gregory Ain in 1937, this two-bedroom bungalow fell into disrepair over the years and was sold as a fixer in 2008 for $370,000.

The Joseph L. Armon House

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This unassuming two-bedroom was built by Rudolf Schindler in 1949.

The Bent-Halstead House

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Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument #394, this 1908 Craftsman was designed by the firm of Eager & Eager.

The H. Stanley Bent House

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Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument #395, this Prairie-style home and carriage house was built circa 1912 by Mayberry & Parker.

Treehaven

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Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument #392, aka Treehaven, this Craftsman-style compound was built between 1908 and 1924 by a firm called the Architectural Design Co.

Wachtel Studio/Home and Eucalyptus Grove

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This early 1900s Craftsman was the studio/home of pioneering Plein Aire painters Elmer and Marion Kavanagh Wachtel. Elmer Wachtel designed the house as well as planted the property's eucalyptus trees, which were used frequently in his paintings.

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The Minster House

One of the first properties in the City of LA to enact a Mills Act contract, this 1911 Craftsman served as a sanitarium for tuberculosis patients before being purchased by Joseph Minster in 1920. Minster, an LA Times reporter, became known as "the mayor of Mount Washington" thanks to his efforts to improve the neighborhood.

The Birtcher-Share House

Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument #612, this Frank Lloyd Wright-influenced residence was built in 1942 by Harwell Hamilton Harris.

The Scholfield House

Los Angeles HCM #613, this compact Usonian home was designed in 1952 by James De Long for local real estate broker Robert Scholfield.

The Wolford House

Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument #614, this 1949 home was the first independent architectural commission of James De Long, a former apprentice of Frank Lloyd Wright and Taliesin Fellow from 1946 to 1947.

The Mauer House

Erected in 1947, this home was architect John Lautner’s third residential commission. The exterior is visible from the street, but only through a grim chain link fence.

The J.B. Merrill House

One of the first three houses built on top of Mt. Washington, this 1909 Craftsman was designed to accommodate a large pipe organ. Owner J.B. Merrill, an accomplished musician, frequently hosted concerts and parties here.

Self-Realization Fellowship HQ

Designed by Chinese Theater architects Meyer and Holler in 1910, the Mission Revival Mt. Washington Hotel closed down only six years later. In 1925, Paramahansa Yogananda bought it to be the Self-Realization Fellowship's international HQ.

The Pilot House

This post and beam was built in 1948 by A. Quincy Jones and his Mutual Housing Association partners as a test study for their Crestwood Hills development.

Young Woo House

Built in 1968 by architect Young Woo as his family residence, this three-bedroom modern just hit the market for the first time. Asking price is $960,000.

The Schmalix Residence

Designed in 1998 by Fung + Blatt, this industrial-modern structure serves as live/work space for the esteemed Austrian painter Hubert Schmalix

Byler House

Built by Gregory Ain in 1937, this two-bedroom bungalow fell into disrepair over the years and was sold as a fixer in 2008 for $370,000.

The Joseph L. Armon House

This unassuming two-bedroom was built by Rudolf Schindler in 1949.

The Bent-Halstead House

Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument #394, this 1908 Craftsman was designed by the firm of Eager & Eager.

The H. Stanley Bent House

Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument #395, this Prairie-style home and carriage house was built circa 1912 by Mayberry & Parker.

Treehaven

Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument #392, aka Treehaven, this Craftsman-style compound was built between 1908 and 1924 by a firm called the Architectural Design Co.

Wachtel Studio/Home and Eucalyptus Grove

This early 1900s Craftsman was the studio/home of pioneering Plein Aire painters Elmer and Marion Kavanagh Wachtel. Elmer Wachtel designed the house as well as planted the property's eucalyptus trees, which were used frequently in his paintings.