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Chairman of LA’s Olympics organizing committee lists Beverly Hills estate for $125M

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If sold at that price, it would be LA’s most expensive home

The grounds include a tiled, 85-foot infinity pool, a pool house, and an area for outdoor dining.
Photos by Simon Berlyn, courtesy of Stephen Shapiro/Westside Estate Agency

A home built for sports and marketing executive Casey Wasserman wants to be a record-holder. The Wall Street Journal reports the sprawling contemporary Beverly Hills estate will come on the market with a $125 million price tag.

If it sells for that much, it would be the county’s most expensive house, unseating a Malibu property that Hard Rock Cafe founder Peter Morton sold earlier this year for $110 million.

The three-acre Beverly Hills compound is owned by Wasserman, an entertainment and sports executive who serves as the chairman of the Los Angeles Organizing Committee for the 2028 Games.

The property was originally three separate parcels—two owned by Wasserman’s grandparents (the Hollywood studio mogul Lew Wasserman and his wife, philanthropist Edie Wasserman) and one owned by Frank Sinatra.

casey wasserman

The house, named Foothill Estate, was built in 2016 and designed by Richard Meier and Partners Architects. Its communal spaces include a “great room” with high ceilings and large automated steel and glass doors that open onto a lawn, dissolving the barrier between indoors and outdoors.

Four bedrooms plus the expansive master suite are upstairs, while staff quarters, a gym, and a screening room are on the first floor. 10- and 12-foot-tall ceilings run throughout the house.

The grounds include a tiled, 85-foot infinity pool, a pool house, and an area for outdoor dining.

Listing agent Stephen Shapiro of the Westside Estate Agency told the Journal that Wasserman was selling because of frequent travel for his role on the Olympic Committee.

Casey Wasserman is a board member at Vox Media, Curbed’s parent company. Vox Media board members have no involvement in Curbed’s editorial planning or execution.