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Rent a 1920s Spanish With a Radical Revamp by Fritz Haeg

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Coated with mica dust, the Silver Lake house "sparkles when viewed from different angles"

If you've been wondering what Fritz Haeg, the artist/designer behind the "Edible Estates" and "Sundown Salon" projects, has been up to lately, wonder no more! As this weekend's issue of T magazine reports, Haeg parted with his locally famous geodesic dome-home in Glassell Park to purchase a 35-acre former commune in Mendocino County known as Salmon Creek Farm that he's now in the process of reviving as an artist colony. And we gotta say, it sounds pretty cool. For instance:

Haeg has invited a young Los Angeles artist named James Herman to turn a huge, burned-out stump of a redwood into an outdoor shower. The San Diego-based artist Keenan Hartsen, meanwhile, is building a site-specific xylophone for the sauna so that, as Haeg describes it, ‘‘you can play the structure.’’ And a Point Reyes-based sculptor, woodworker and abalone diver named Ido Yoshimoto has been fashioning furniture from the abundant fallen tree matter.

In other Haeg-related news, an eye-catching Silver Lake residence the artist revamped in 2004 has just become available for rent. According to a 2008 New York Times feature on the property, owner David Bernardi commissioned Haeg to give his 1920s Spanish duplex a modernist makeover after getting inspired by RM Schindler's Falk Apartments across the street.

Per the listing, the 2,575-square-foot house features two bedrooms, three baths, living and dining rooms, a media room with surround sound, an interior terrarium, custom built-in seating and storage, multiple terraces, a separate gym/guest quarters, a black pebble-lined infinity pool, a one-car garage, and views of the Hollywood sign, Griffith Park Observatory, and the hills. Alas, the rent is as steep as those surrounding hills—$8,200/month, to be exact.

1817 Lucile Avenue Los Angeles CA 90026 [Architecture for Sale]

Communal Living, the 21st Century Way [T Magazine]

A Spanish-Modern Mashup in Los Angeles [NYT]